C/C++/SystemC HLS

Catapult is the only High-Level Synthesis Platform to natively support both ANSI C++ and SystemC, giving designers the freedom to work in their preferred language and move up to a more productive abstraction level. 

 

  • Native dual-language support of SystemC and C++
  • Control and predictability required to achieve design closure on complex designs
  • Comprehensive design management and assembly systems with 10X capacity
  • Integration with standard functional verification methodologies
  • Verification-optimized RTL code

C/C++/SystemC HLS

Catapult is the only High-Level Synthesis Platform to natively support both ANSI C++ and SystemC, giving designers the freedom to work in their preferred language and move up to a more productive abstraction level. Abstract models synthesizable by Catapult typically require 80 percent less hand-written code and can simulate up to 1,000 times faster than synthesizable RTL.

From these high-level descriptions, Catapult generates optimized Verilog or VHDL, ready for production RTL synthesis and verification flows. The platform gives designers control over which regions are optimized and the ability to work top-down or bottom-up, which is required for RTL IP integration.

The database and smart caching techniques provide at least a 10X capacity improvement, making the synthesis of large subsystems possible. The synthesized RTL is optimized for power, performance, area, and timing closure. This verification-optimized RTL code is ready to be deployed into corporate verification methodologies, including UVM-based flows.

Advanced Algorithmic Evaluation for Imaging, Communication and Audio Applications

This report discusses the hardware implementation of “eigenvalue decomposition”. Eigenvalue decomposition is used in a wide range of applications for imaging, communication and audio such as image recognition using KL conversion, high-speed communication using MIMO antenna, and electric/sound wave arrival direction estimation using MUSIC method. It is expected that more than four antennas will be required in many cases for future MIMO communications and electric wave arrival direction estimation with MUSIC method applications. With four antennas, the table size will be 4x4 with complex numbers and the computational load will be increased, so we were interested in verifying whether the method to obtain eigenvalues directly from the eigenvalue equation was reasonable or not. Therefore, we developed two effective algorithms in ANSI C++ to obtain eigenvalues and synthesized them with Catapult® to compare the area versus the number of cycles at the algorithm level, respectively.

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